• How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Coffee
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Injera
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Spices
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Bread
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Vegan & Fasting Foods
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Beans and Lentils
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Salads And Fit Fit
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Meat Dishes
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Breakfast
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Fish
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Drinks
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Snacks
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Restaurants
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Recipes
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Gallery
  • How To Cook Great Ethiopian - Amharic Cooking Channel

Salads & Fitfit

Fitfit or firfir (Ge’ez: ፍርፍር firfir; ፍትፍት fitfit) is an Ethiopian food typically served for breakfast (though it can be served with other meals).

It is generally made with spiced clarified butter (called niter kibbeh in Amharic) and berbere. In some cases, various oils or butters are substituted for clarified butter; however, the difference in taste is notable. There are two major varieties of fit-fit: injera and kita is a combination of shredded injera, berbere, onions, and clarified butter. Variations on this basic recipe are common in which the name of the additional item is commonly used as a prefix. For instance, if one were to add shiro (chickpeas puree), the resulting dish would be called shiro fit-fit. If one were to add broth (mereq) it would be called mereq fit-fit. (Merek). Injera fit-fit can be eaten with either a spoon when served in a bowl or eaten with the right hand when served atop of another piece of injera as is typical in Ethiopian or Eritrean cuisine. There are also several cold mixtures of injera, like tomato (timatim) and onion, Nug, Telba, suff flower and many others. The bottom line is that you can mix any type of food you like with injera, hot or cold or with a sauce or perhaps a salad dressing of lemon and olive oil to create a fitful or firfir.

Ethiopian salad can and often is on the spicy side, take Azifa a lentil salad, this has a hot mustard or wasbi type of heat to it with what is called Sanafitch. A few fresh chillies are often popped into a regular potato salad as well. Beets or beetroot are very popular in Ethiopian food.

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